Ballet Folklorico Mexicano

Chitresh Das Youth Company

Eddie Madril

Ensambles Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco

Gurus of Dance

Jaranon y Bochinche

Maxi Copello & Raquel Makow

Melissa Cruz

Parangal Dance Company

Peninsula Ballet Theatre

TRIBE & Poise’n

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Program

SATURDAY, JULY 16 7PM

 

ACT ONE

Eddie Madril

Accompanied by a traditional hand drum and singer, this piece moves through the story-scape of traditional Native American Hoop Dance.

 

Ballet Folklorico Mexicano de Carlos Moreno

The mestizo dances of Nayarit are comprised of sones and potorricos. These Huichol and Cora indigenous dances have great Spanish influence.

 

PBT

“Kick in the Head”

 

Maxi & Raquel

Tango

 

Stuck Sanders

 

Melissa Cruz

This presentation is an interpretation that pays homage to traditional flamenco from the heart of Andalusia.

 

Parangal

Parageyan Kamatettoahan, Ancestor’s Traditions showcases dance from indigenous Yakan people of Basilan, Sulu Archipelago.

Peninsula Ballet Theatre’s Artistic Director Gregory Amato will present short entr'actes drawn from Americana styles of music and dance representing a broad swath of the United States: from sultry Manhattan jazz clubs and that structured improvisational style used by jazz musicians; to country/western cowboy culture and honky-tonk bars where romance and heartbreak reign supreme; to the Old Hollywood glamour of Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers with sweeping dances set to the greatest crooners of the day.

 

ACT TWO

Ensambles Ballet Folklórico

Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco is excited to showcase the vibrant dances and costumes inspired by the religious and pagan traditions of the central and coastal areas of Sinaloa.

 

PBT

“Tap” and “Natural Woman"

 

Chitresh Das Youth Company

Kathak dance is known for intricate footwork and fast pirouettes in complex rhythmic compositions.

 

Maxi & Raquel

Tango

 

Tribe & Poise’n

An all-new West Coast Hip Hop dance featuring turfing and roboting with dramatic narrative accessible to the whole family.

 

PBT

“LOVE

 

Gurus of Dance

A prayer to Lord Ganesha. The dance style is a traditional Indian Folk Dance mixed with elements inspired from Hindi film dance.

SUNDAY, JULY 17TH 2PM

 

ACT ONE

Eddie Madril

Accompanied by a traditional hand drum and singer, this piece moves through the stotry-scape of traditional Native American Hoop Dance.

Ensambles Ballet Folklórico

Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco is excited to showcase the vibrant dances and costumes inspired by the religious and pagan traditions of the central and coastal areas of Sinaloa.

 

PBT 

“Kick in the Head"

 

Maxi & Raquel

Tango

 

Jaranon y Bochinche

Three types of Afro-Peruvian dance styles, Festejo, Afro, and Lando.

 

Stuck Sanders

 

Parangal

Parageyan Kamatettoahan, Ancestor’s Traditions showcases dance from indigenous Yakan people of Basilan, Sulu Archipelago.

 

Peninsula Ballet Theatre’s Artistic Director Gregory Amato will present short entr'actes drawn from Americana styles of music and dance representing a broad swath of the United States: from sultry Manhattan jazz clubs and that structured improvisational style used by jazz musicians; to country/western cowboy culture and honky-tonk bars where romance and heartbreak reign supreme; and to the Old Hollywood glamour of Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers with sweeping dances set to the greatest crooners of the day.

 

ACT TWO

Ensambles Ballet Folklórico

Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco is excited to showcase the vibrant dances and costumes inspired by the religious and pagan traditions of the central and coastal areas of Sinaloa.

 

PBT

“Natural Woman” and “Tap”

 

Chitresh Das Youth Company

Kathak dance is known for intricate footwork and fast pirouettes in complex rhythmic compositions.

 

Maxi & Raquel

Tango

 

Tribe & Poise’n

An all-new West Coast Hip Hop dance featuring turfing and roboting with dramatic narrative accessible to the whole family.

 

PBT

“LOVE”

 

Gurus of Dance

A prayer to Lord Ganesha. The dance style is a traditional Indian Folk Dance mixed with elements inspired from Hindi film dance.

 
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Ballet Folklorico Mexicano

Carlos Moreno-Samaniego

General Director

Carlos Moreno-Samaniego learned about the performing arts at an early age. His father Marcos Moreno directed and performed in a group that presented ceremonial dances throughout the region of Nazas, Durango, Mexico; while his mother designed the costumes, sets, and props for these performances. His formal dance instruction began at the age of 7, at age 11 he enrolled in a government-sponsored dance and culture program. During his five years of training in the program, he performed with a local dance company that presented shows in schools throughout the Nazas region. After completing high school, Mr. Moreno’s artistic ambitions led him to study folkloric dance in Guadalajara, under the instruction of Maestro Rafael Zamarripa. There after he continued his dance education with the renown Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez’ dance school.

Founded in 1967 by Carlos Moreno-Samaniego, the Ballet Folklorico Mexicano has achieved recognition both in the United States and in Mexico. In 1980, the Mexican consulate in San Francisco named the company the official ambassador for ongoing cultural activities with Mexico. It has held that distinction for over forty years during which time it regularly conducts tours in Mexican cities such as Guadalajara, Oaxaca, Aguascalientes, and Durango.

 

Drawing on the artistic variety of Mexico’s different regions, the Ballet Folklorico Mexicano has a dance repertory of 120 pieces. Many of these are presented in their traditional form while others have been restaged to include artistic elements from more contemporary choreography. In this way, the indigenous rhythms of Tarascan Indian dances from central Mexico stand in sharp contrast to the Spanish military and courtship dances from that region. Similarly the African influences that characterize dances from the Gulf of Mexico are juxtaposed by Mexican polkas that mark the influence of eastern European from the north. In her review of the company, Jennifer Fisher, the celebrated dance critic for the Los Angeles Times, noted that the Ballet “has much appeal. They are tightly rehearsed and (their) choreography is inventive.”

 

 

www.balletfolkloricomexicano.org